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When Habitat came to our house…

Back in September last year it was a massive honour to be featured in Habitat’s ‘Habitat Voyeur’ series. For those who aren’t familiar, it’s a feature they run on the website which snoops around people’s houses and shows some of the gorgeous Habitat products in situ. Previous profiles include my friend Alice Levine, Laura Jackson…

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Slow Sunday Recipe: a warming, nourishing rhubarb crumble

The result was utterly delicious and I thought I should share the recipe with you here because it was so simple. Rhubarb is just coming into season and I just cannot get enough of cooking with it at the moment. It’s just one of my favourite all-time ingredients – I love the way it transforms with sugar into a sherbety, sour goo, and I’m so excited that we’ve inherited a crown of it down at the allotment. Expect more rhubarb recipes coming soon and please comment and share your favourites with me too as I’d love to know your go-to rhubarb recipes.

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Recipe for the weekend: Creamy Jerusalem Artichoke Pie

Sweet, earthy and incredibly nutty, I feel they are one of the most exciting luxuries of the winter larder, and while I love them roasted, skin-on, to crispy caramelised lusciousness with rare roast beef, this recipe makes them the centrepiece and uses their flavour to lace a savoury pie befitting of any special dinner or Sunday lunch.

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Scholars of speciality coffee – a day of cupping and cooking, plus a charity cookbook giveaway

Every day I feel like I learn something new, and while I try and retain as much as possible (though my brain seems to be intent on making space for new things – aka – having massive memory lapses), it’s often a case of relearning, and reminding yourself of things you learned before. Such was the case a few weeks ago when I went back to cookery school for the second of our Taylors of Harrogate x Creating For Good workshops.

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Recipe for a foolproof warming tomato and coconut dal

At this time of year, it’s so nice to have some recipes up your sleeve for dishes that are comforting, warming and nourishing, but also – more crucially – that don’t take hours and hours to prep. With Christmas just around the corner, we’re all going to have so much cooking to do, and subsequent kitchen fatigue, it’s a relief to find some dishes that hit the spot and only take a matter of minutes to rustle up. Dal is one of the few things I could genuinely eat every day – it’s both satisfying and interesting, not just in the context of curry, but as a vehicle for eggs, poached or fried, and a side for all manner of proteins.

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Tea, Travel and Stories: An Extraordinary Journey, Part One

I spent a large chunk of my twenties travelling about, exploring the world, sometimes with friends and boyfriends, but mostly for work, via press trips that took me to far flung places I could never have afforded on a freelance writer’s wage.

Reporting on the food and drink of a particular place is a sure-fire way to cut through the tourist trap cliches and get to an authentic local experience, and I was lucky to find myself in unlikely places enjoying delicious things – be it eating freshly caught whelks at a plastic table at the corner of Rungis – the legendary French Food market; or chewing garlic and fish sauced-laced pork skewers, cooked for me by an elderly Vietnamese woman crouching on her haunches in the Street in Hanoi.

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